Guide to the New MCAT Score Conversion – How Does Your Score Compare?

Greet change with a smile.

The MCAT has taken a new shift. 

Is it for better or for worse? From the old MCAT to new MCAT, many would disagree with the new scoring system. 

The MCAT score range has changed. The inclusion of new sections and MCAT percentiles are the key takeaways in this new MCAT scoring

I think the old MCAT score range was simpler. It was easier to understand. And the range isn’t as extensive to the current MCAT score range

If you take a closer look, the range in the old MCAT score scale of 15 is the same in the new MCAT score scale

What’s the point then? Well, keep reading this Test Prep Genie article! 

Old MCAT vs. New MCAT

Whether or not you dislike the MCAT score percentiles system, it’s still useful to compare your performance to students and schools from all over. 

What does that mean? 

It means aiming for a higher MCAT score based on the new MCAT percentiles. 

Now, let’s break down the new MCAT scoring and the old vs. new MCAT scores

Old MCAT Score Chart

Length of exam: 5 hours

  • 1 writing section
  • 3 multiple-choice sections
  • Sections have a score range between 1 to 15, with a total score ranging between 3 to 45.

MCAT Sections: 

  • Verbal
  • Physical Science
  • Biological Science

New MCAT Score Chart

Length of exam: 7 hours

  • No writing section
  • 4 multiple-choice sections
  • Sections have a score range between 118 to 132, with a total score ranging between 472 to 528

MCAT Sections: 

  • Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems
  • Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills
  • Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems
  • Psychological, Social, And Biological Foundations of Behavior

Old vs. New MCAT: Similarities 

The score range for both the old and new MCAT still have a range of 15. (1 – 15 on the old MCAT scale and 118 – 132 on the new MCAT scale) 

From the old MCAT to new MCAT, the scale in scoring for both the old and new MCAT is quite similar then. The new MCAT score is just the old MCAT score in disguise. 

Old vs. New MCAT: Differences

From the old MCAT to new MCAT, there are considerable differences.

Starting with the new MCAT without any writing section and a longer exam length. There are also now 4 MCAT sections.

The key differences, though, are the MCAT percentiles. The scoring system in the new MCAT is more intimidating than the old MCAT with a range of 1 – 15. 

What Does This Change Mean?

While the score range is practically the same, comparing these scores and converting your score from the new MCAT to old MCAT or vice versa should be taken with a grain of salt.  

What this means then is even with the recent changes, the MCAT is still like any other exam designed to measure how well you perform in the test academically, analytically, and in pacing/test strategy.

Old to New MCAT Conversion: Score & Percentiles

Old MCAT
New MCAT
MCAT Percentiles
45
528
>99
44
527
>99
43
527
>99
42
526
>99
41
525
>99
40
524
>99
39
523
99
38
522
99
37
520
98
36
518
96
35
517
95
34
515
92
33
514
90
32
512
85
31
510
80
30
508
74
29
506
68
28
504
61
27
503
58
26
501
51
25
499
44
24
498
41
23
496
34
22
494
28
21
493
25
20
491
20
19
490
18
18
488
14
17
486
10
16
485
8
15
484
7
14
483
6
13
482
5
12
480
3
11
479
2
10
478
2
9
477
1
8
477
1
7
476
1
6
475
<1
5
474
<1
4
473
<1
3
472
<1

Old MCAT to New MCAT Conversion: Scores and Percentiles for Sections/Individual Topics

Old MCAT
New MCAT
MCAT Percentiles
15
132
>99
14
131
>99
13
130
>99
12
129
>99
11
128
>99
10
127
>99
9
126
99
8
125
99
7
124
98
6
123
96
5
122
95
4
121
92
3
120
90
2
119
85
1
118
80

Now that you know the MCAT score conversion maybe you wonder how long are MCAT scores good for, check it out in my other article!

Table of Contents

FAQs

The MCAT score percentiles matter to an extent. Using the percentiles helps you compare how you perform against everyone else who took the test. This is a good performance gauge and is an added benefit apart from just comparing scores.

The MCAT percentiles are not to be seen as a percentage of correct answers. The percentiles inform how well you score in terms of position against others. 

For example, if you score the 97th percentile in the exam, it means 97% scored the same score or lower. This means you’re in the top 3% of all test takers. If you want to see more percentile ranks in the MCAT, this will help.